September 25, 2018

 

Immunotherapy for Cervical Cancer-Hope Medical Group

Disadvantages of Radiotherapy & Chemotherapy
Chemotherapy works by interrupting cell division in cells that are multiplying quickly. Since cancer cells reproduce at an abnormally fast rate, they are affected by chemotherapy. Several cycles are needed to catch more cells, since not all of them will be dividing on the day you get chemotherapy. Unfortunately, other cells in your body also reproduce quickly enough to be affected by the treatment. Hair follicles shut down, which means your hair either falls out or does not grow. The linings of the mouth, stomach, and intestines also contain cells that multiply rapidly. These cells are disrupted by chemotherapy, which can cause mouth sores, a "burned tongue" sensation, nausea, constipation, hemorrhoids, and diarrhea.
The disadvantage of radiotherapy is also the worry that the cancer will come back.

Non-surgical treatments
DC + CIK cells can effectively cure cancer.
Today, tumors can be detected early and removed with advanced surgery and treatment, but current therapies cannot prevent or eradicate cancer after metastatic spread to distant organs. The prognosis is very poor if Cancer spreads to the brain. As a shielded "sanctuary site," the brain may harbor cancer cells which resist current treatments and can develop into satellite tumors, known as metastases, long after chemo-, radiation, or immuno- therapies have been applied. The patient's situation can be managed in the clinic only for a few weeks or months before becoming fatal.
Our DC+CIK cancer treatment provides new hope for patients, through an innovative approach based on stem cells, the body's own natural mechanism for healing and regeneration.
Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells are important immune cells, and dendritic cells (DC) can be induced to be co-cultured with CD3 + CD56 + (NKT) phenotype main groups of T-killer cells (DCCIK). Immunotherapy in cancer patients showed a broad spectrum of killing tumor cells, its function and use of exogenous split-mediated tumor cell material, tumor-associated antigen-activated DC, CIK cells co-cultured cells different, is not major histocompatibility complex (MHC) restricted, and there is a strong anti-tumor immune activity. It also significantly reduces the immune tolerance of cancer patients, a decrease of T suppressor cells (Treg1 immunosuppression and effectively prevent the generation of autoimmune disease in patients.

In short, DC+CIK cells in the human body's own immune system enhance and rebuild its immune system, automatically identify and track tumor cells, and transmit this information to patients own immune cells, promoting their activation and proliferate to eliminate residual metastatic lesions, prevent spread and recurrence of cancer and enhance immunity. This improves the quality of life of patients, ultimately prolonging the patients life for years.

Cervical cancer is the term for a malignant neoplasm arising from cells originating in the cervix uteri. One of the most common symptoms of cervical cancer is abnormal vaginal bleeding, but in some cases there may be no obvious symptoms until the cancer has progressed to an advanced stage. Treatment usually consists of surgery (including local excision) in early stages, and chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in more advanced stages of the disease.

The cervix is the narrow portion of the uterus where it joins with the top of the vagina. Most cervical cancers are squamous cell carcinomas, arising in the squamous (flattened) epithelial cells that line the cervix. Adenocarcinoma, arising in glandular epithelial cells is the second most common type. Very rarely, cancer can arise in other types of cells in the cervix.

The early stages of cervical cancer may be completely asymptomatic. Vaginal bleeding, contact bleeding, or (rarely) a vaginal mass may indicate the presence of malignancy. Also, moderate pain during sexual intercourse and vaginal discharge are symptoms of cervical cancer. In advanced disease, metastases may be present in the abdomen, lungs or elsewhere.

Symptoms of advanced cervical cancer may include: loss of appetite, weight loss, fatigue, pelvic pain, back pain, leg pain, swollen legs, heavy bleeding from the vagina, bone fractures, and/or (rarely) leakage of urine or faeces from the vagina (rarely).

You may not experience any cervical cancer symptoms — early cervical cancer generally produces no signs or symptoms. As the cancer progresses, the following signs and symptoms of more advanced cervical cancer may appear:

Vaginal bleeding after intercourse, between periods or after menopause

. Watery, bloody vaginal discharge that may be heavy and have a foul odor
. Pelvic pain or pain during intercourse

Cervical cancer begins when healthy cells acquire a genetic mutation that turns normal cells into abnormal cells. Healthy cells grow and multiply at a set rate, eventually dying at a set time. Cancer cells grow and multiply out of control, and they don't die. The accumulating abnormal cells form a mass (tumor). Cancer cells invade nearby tissues and can break off from an initial tumor to spread elsewhere in the body (metastasize).

What causes cervical cancer isn't clear. However, it's certain that the sexually transmitted infection called human papillomavirus (HPV) plays a role. Evidence of HPV is found in nearly all cervical cancers. However, HPV is a very common virus and most women with HPV never develop cervical cancer. This means other risk factors, such as your genetic makeup, your environment or your lifestyle choices, also determine whether you'll develop cervical cancer.

Types of Cervical Cancer

The type of cell where the initial genetic mutation occurred determines the type of cervical cancer you have. The type of cervical cancer you have helps determine your prognosis and treatment. The main types of cervical cancer are:

Squamous cell carcinomas.
These begin in the thin, flat cells that line the bottom of the cervix (squamous cells). This type accounts for the great majority of cervical cancers.


Adenocarcinomas.
These occur in the glandular cells that line the cervical canal. These cancers make up a smaller portion of cervical cancers.

Sometimes both types of cells are involved in cervical cancer. Very rare cancers can occur in other cells in the cervix.

 For more information on stem cell immunotherapy for cervical cancer, please complete a medical form here or visit http://hopestemcell.com/cancer-immunology

 

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